The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe

Chocolate gift box from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Chocolate gift box from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

A good friend helped me celebrate my birthday with the gustatory equivalent of the fabled fountain of youth. Chocolate.

Chocolate!

And not just any chocolate, but a truly decadent assortment of epicurean dark chocolates from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe. All semblance of restraint abandons me when confronted with good chocolate, and this most recent experience was no exception. I gorged!

And just to tease/tempt you, I’m going to share a few of my favorites. Digitally. Sorry…

Sybaritic Sampling from The Chocolate Smith

I love dark chocolate. Even before I was diagnosed with lactose intolerance (20+ years ago) and casein intolerance (5+ years ago), I gravitated toward chocolate with the highest percentage of cacao. The following treats betray my bias, so I figured I’d better get that out in the open right from the get-go.

Chocolate covered with cacao nibs from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Cacao nib covered chocolate from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

I’m a sucker for textures, so this beauty snared me as I opened the lid. Crushed cacao nibs inside dark chocolate, sprinkled with more crushed cacao nibs. Did I mention cacao nibs?

If you love chocolate, real chocolate (not the waxy sugarbombs we too often call chocolate) then this thin-but-lumpy decadence is for you. It’s crunchy and almost nutty in the way that toasted cacao nibs are. It’ll leave “hoolies” in your teeth, but it’s totally worth the mockery from your loved ones. Trust me.

Cherry cluster from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Cherry cluster from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Mingling texture with sweet-and-sour, I turned to this chewy cherry cluster. Vaguely tart dried cherries punch up the sharpness of the dark chocolate for a dazzling taste. Make no mistake, this chocolate is plenty sweet, but the familiar chocolate flavors become unfamiliar given the cherry nuances. This delicacy would make an extraordinary breakfast starter with a shot of espresso!

Chocolate swirl from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Chocolate swirl from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

I started with two of the more decadent chocolates in the gift box, so now I turn to the simple, unadulterated bliss of chocolate. Less is more. This is The Chocolate Smith’s signature blend of 72% dark chocolate, and it’s a powerful reminder that chocolate needn’t be gussied up to dazzle. On the contrary, good chocolate is often best in the buff.

Peanut butter bar from The ChocolateSmith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Peanut butter bar from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Pretty, right? And pretty tasty too! This rectangular brick of bliss is the Peanut Butter Bar. A good sized hunk of creamy organic peanut butter takes a swim in a vat of dark chocolate, and this striped charmer is the result. Imagine the patron saint of peanut butter cups, and you’re getting close to the mark.

Petite dark chocolate from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Petite dark chocolate from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Akin to the peanut butter bar, but the heart and soul of this chocolate is vanilla blushed ganache. I suspect that I may have wandered into the forbidden realm of dairy given the heavenly creaminess of this confection. So good. Dipped in dark chocolate in case a lump of ganache isn’t decadent enough.

Ginger dipped chocolate from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Ginger dipped chocolate from The Chocolate Smith in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

This mysterious looking wonder is dipped ginger. Chunks of dried/candied ginger soaked in sake are smothered in dark chocolate. It’s an appetizer, palate cleanser, meal, dessert, and digestif all in one! And it’s large enough to share if you’re generous (and super disciplined.)

About The Chocolate Smith

Santa Fe chocolate lovers are extremely fortunate to have several gourmet cacao-to-confection specialists who ply their enchanted arts in The City Different. The Chocolate Smith is one of several that is part of the New Mexico Chocolate Trail!

Looking for the best hand-crafted dark chocolate in the world? (Source: santafe.org)

 

Gourmet dark chocolate by The Chocolate Smith is made by hand using a bittersweet blend of dark chocolate and premium, fresh, local, and organic ingredients. Indulge in timeless chocolate classics or explore contemporary twists and regional flairs. Whichever your preference, be ready for an over-the-top chocolate experience. (Source: www.chocolatesmith.com)

 

The storefront at Chocolate Smith might remind you of your grandmother’s house, with its quaint retro-style displays and pastel-oriented décor. It’s a well-lit, wide-open space, so you can watch as candy makers stir, temper, dip, and cut just beyond the display counter; this also means that chocolate’s heady aroma hits you right as you walk in the door. Chocolate Smith offers a nearly overwhelming range… (Source: “Restaurant Review: Chocolate tiers” via santafenewmexican.com)

The Chocolate Smith was featured on The Food Network’s Road Tasted series.

Visit The Chocolate Smith

If you’re hankering for some world class chocolate, then we recommend you swing by The Chocolate Smith for an experience your taste buds won’t soon forget. And if you’re not close enough to drop in, you can order online!

Chef John Rivera Sedlar’s Eloisa Restaurant 

Eloisa Restaurant's Chef John Rivera Sedlar (Source: eloisasantafe.com)

Eloisa Restaurant’s Chef John Rivera Sedlar (Source: eloisasantafe.com)

Much anticipated and much celebrated Chef John Rivera Sedlar opened his first Santa Fe restaurant last year after an extraordinarily successful restaurant career in Los Angeles. And I’ve been returning eagerly ever since the first days open. My most recent visit to enjoy Sedlar’s creative twist on modern southwest cuisine was no exception, except I finally managed to eat slowly enough to take photographs before inhaling his design-forward creations.

Belated Birthday at Eloisa Restaurant

A missed birthday provided the perfect excuse to try Eloisa’s new menu. No birthday cake but all manner of debaucherous dining ensued. Here’s a glimpse.

Eloisa's Cochiti Pueblo Gazpacho (Source: Geo Davis)

Eloisa’s Cochiti Pueblo Gazpacho (Source: Geo Davis)

I started with Cochiti Pueblo Gazpacho, a “chilled summer soup of cantaloupe and honeydew” melons. This creative twist on gazpacho soup was pureed into a viscous liquid as refreshing as it was beautiful. I imagine this dish would be equally wonderful for breakfast and dessert.

Eloisa's Pastrami Tacos (Source: Geo Davis)

Eloisa’s Pastrami Tacos (Source: Geo Davis)

Although my dining partner—aka “the birthday boy”—exercised greater restraint, choosing two small plates for his meal, I succumbed to temptation and doubled up my appetizers. Although much of Eloisa original menu has changed in the most recent incarnation, one of my favorites is still being offered. The miniature Pastrami Tacos are stuffed with “spicy smoked beef, sauerkraut, pickled chilies” and that unnaturally yellow mustard referred to by the chef as “ballpark mustard”. Oddly enough, it works. In fact, it really works! I’ve ordered these every time I’ve eaten at Eloisa, and I don’t intend to alter my guilty habit until they are removed from the menu. (Note: the order is served with four tiny tacos, but I wasn’t able to resist gobbling one before snapping the photo.)

Eloisa's Beef Tenderloin Tierra y Mar (Source: Geo Davis)

Eloisa’s Beef Tenderloin Tierra y Mar (Source: Geo Davis)

For my main course I ordered the Beef Tenderloin Tierra y Mar, but the chef adapted the dish to accommodate my dairy-free diet. Normally served, “wood-grilled with shrimp, potato-corn gratin, asparagus, chipotle béarnaise”, a smoky reduction was invented to replace of the béarnaise, and additional asparagus (after all, they are in season!) stood in for the gratin. The steak was marginally overcooked, but the medley of flavors worked so nicely so that I enjoyed every bite without complaint.

Eloisa's Wood-Grilled Asparagus Salad (Source: Geo Davis)

Eloisa’s Wood-Grilled Asparagus Salad (Source: Geo Davis)

The birthday boy started with a Wood-Grilled Asparagus Salad consisting of “lemon olive oil, lime cream, garrotxa cheese snow”. He was well satisfied with his generously proportioned order.

Eloisa's Crispy Oysters on the Half Shell (Source: Geo Davis)

Eloisa’s Crispy Oysters on the Half Shell (Source: Geo Davis)

For his main course he ordered Crispy Oysters on the Half Shell which arrived with a steamy aroma so tempting I almost asked for one of his half dozen delicacies. But it was his birthday, so I swallowed my greed. These “blue cornmeal-crusted fresh oysters with tropical salsa” were enormous! He romanced each oyster, only pausing when he reached the last one. After eating half he pled too content to continue and insisted that I try the final bite. Without hesitation, I accepted his offer and the still-warm creaminess melted in my mouth. Divine!

I’ve skipped the liquid refreshments, but suffice to say that several wines were sampled from the well curated wine list. And a unique cocktail to boot! Perhaps a future post will be dedicated to Eloisa’s libations… Stay tuned.

About Eloisa Restaurant in Santa Fe

Chef Rivera named his new restaurant after his grandmother and is cooking “elemental” New Mexican dishes that celebrate the traditions of southwestern women. It seems he’s off to a great start as Eloisa was nominated for best new restaurant in the 2016 James Beard Awards.

The vaguely cosmopolitan L.A. vibe seems fitting at Eloisa, which chef John Rivera Sedlar opened in the new Drury Plaza Hotel to herald his return from the City of Angels to the City Different. He named his restaurant for his grandmother, a fact you’ll learn from your menu. Sedlar pays homage to his Northern New Mexico roots by including traditional dishes — rellenos, calabacitas, carne adovada, and Frito pie — often given a creative personal spin. So many of them are remarkable in texture, flavor, and seasoning. (Source: santafenewmexican.com)

 

Eloisa pays homage to the female figures Sedlar grew up with — it is named after his grandmother and borrows inspiration from the kitchens of Sedlar’s various relatives. As a child, he was especially inspired by Eloisa – she was the artist Georgia O’Keeffe’s personal chef for 15 years – and her philosophy: namely, mastering how to make much of little. “Southwestern ingredients are limited,” Sedlar says, “but there’s a variety and dimension to them.” (Source: The New York Times)

 

Few grandmothers have had the luxury of such a regally appointed kitchen as the immaculately gleaming kitchen which graces Eloisa. It’s twice the size of the kitchen at Rivera, Chef Sedlar’s last restaurant in Los Angeles. You’ll want to be seated in close proximity so you can lustily ogle the transformation of down-to-earth New Mexican ingredients into exotic creations which both honor and elevate the Land of Enchantment’s culinary traditions. Watching the kitchen staff assiduously go about their prep work with the efficiency and synchronicity of drone bees is almost mesmerizing. Eloisa’s commodious dining room seats 120 guests inside and weather-permitting, another 65 guests on the patio. (Source: nmgastronome.com)

Visit Eloisa Restaurant in Santa Fe

You should visit Eloisa and try the mouth-watering dishes I’ve described for yourself! The restaurant is open for lunch on Monday – Friday, 11:30 – 2:30. Open for dinner on Sunday – Thursday, 5:30 – 9:00 and Friday & Saturday, 5:30 – 10:00.

Last Waltz: Spring Skiing in Santa Fe

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe, New Mexico (Source: Geo Davis)

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe, New Mexico (Source: Geo Davis)

One month ago, on April 5, 2017, I skinned and skied Santa Fe’s local ski hill for the last time second to last time this season.

Long after winter had turned into spring and the snow had begun to melt, Santa Fe received several significant snowfalls. In the vernacular of my fellow powder hounds, a couple of “epic dumps”. Lift service had ended on April 2, so I lashed on my boards and skins and headed uphill to catch the fresh powder.

Here’s a glimpse of uphill portion of my most memorable ski of the year.

As you can see, the conditions were A+ immaculate!

I started out early enough that I barely saw a soul (even though a couple of headlamp-hardy skinners must have made it to the summit for sunrise.) On my ski-out, I must have passed 3-4 dozen people skinning up. Plenty of powder left for all of them…

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe, New Mexico (Source: Geo Davis)

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe, New Mexico (Source: Geo Davis)

Although I envisioned this as my last ski day, my bride decided that she wanted a final lick at the hill before the daffodils pushed their golden heads into the blue sky. So we headed up the following weekend.

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

Spring Skinning and Skiing in Santa Fe (Source: Geo Davis)

The conditions were mushier at the bottom and icier up high, but this sun-soaked spring adventure with my bride and dog offered a glorious curtain call for an amazing ski season. Thanks, Ski Santa Fe!

Ski Santa Fe and Artistic Side Trips

A view from a ski lift at Ski Santa Fe in Santa Fe National Forest’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains. (Photo Source: Jennifer Hiller /San Antonio Express-News)

A view from a ski lift at Ski Santa Fe in Santa Fe National Forest’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains. (Photo Source: Jennifer Hiller /San Antonio Express-News)

Jennifer Hiller and her family visited Santa Fe and she wrote about her experiences in the San Antonio Express-News. The majority of the article describes their days skiing in Santa Fe, not Taos or another location, but a mountain right in Santa Fe!

“From Ski Santa Fe’s 10,350 base elevation to its peaks above 12,000 feet, there’s a family vibe, top-of-the-world views and nary a ski snob in sight. […] skiing in Santa Fe is really right there, just 16 miles from downtown. It took maybe 30 minutes to get from our hotel to the parking lot.” (Skiing with a side of art in Santa Fe)

While described as not a ski in-and-out/condo/spa resort-type of ski location, the accessibility and ease of Ski Santa Fe marks it as a great ski destination — Jennifer notes that she and her family did more actual skiing there than on other ski trips. She also notes that at Ski Santa Fe there is a ski school for kids.

When not skiing, Jennifer wrote about exploring the variety of offerings of downtown Santa Fe, but she spent the latter half of her article talking about her family’s visit to Meow Wolf (which we previously mentioned in this post “Santa Fe Culture: Past Meets Future“).

Meow Wolf is composed of different artistic components; one section is an arts-and-crafts studio that Jennifer and the kids took refuge in when another section of Meow Wolf, the “House of Eternal Return,” became a bit much for them. Here’s how she described it:

Meow Wolf’s “House of Eternal Return” is a mashup of a Victorian home, jungle gym, the Twilight Zone, Alice in Wonderland and some of the stranger nightclubs I went to back in the day. […] There is a lot going on – some sort of space-time, alternative dimension thing is happening. My friend and I tried to figure it out, but mostly we tried not to lose our children, who kept doing things like going into refrigerators that were actually doors to other rooms, or disappearing into fireplaces that led to other worlds.” (Skiing with a side of art in Santa Fe)

Jennifer concludes that “the entire trip to Santa Fe was […] filled with unexpected discoveries that made us feel a world away from the daily grind.” A perfect sentiment that many feel after visiting! If you want to read about her full experiences in Santa Fe here’s the full article “Skiing with a side of art in Santa Fe.”

Santa Fe Culture: Past Meets Future

Past Meets Future (Travel + Leisure)

Becoming Human, a 30-foot-tall sculpture by Christian Ristow, greets visitors to the House of Eternal Return. Brian Finke (Source: “Past Meets Future”, Travel + Leisure)

The city’s carefully constructed image as a mecca of Southwestern-themed art, turquoise jewelry, and folksy spiritualism has lately begun to evolve, thanks to a group of oddball artists and entrepreneurs who insist on seeing their hometown differently. (Source: Amanda Fortini, “In Santa Fe, the Past Meets the Future”Travel + Leisure)

In this Travel + Leisure article, Fortini explains how the cultural identity of Santa Fe was deliberately crafted to portray its Southwestern aesthetic to encourage tourism — “the idea was to give the city a historic regional identity and the patina of an exotic travel destination.” It has worked well and the city does attract many travelers and it has even become one of the best known art destinations in the United States. However, some felt that the the art styles being promoted and encouraged were only those that fit with the theme already embraced as the Santa Fe style and limited the possibilities of new art styles. That has recently begun to change.

Using a new installation created by the company Meow Wolf as an ultimate example of the new artistic movement, Fortini describes The House of Eternal Return “as a haunted house without the monsters, an amusement park without the rides, an acid trip without the drugs,” it is both an abstract visual experience and has a mysterious narrative waiting to be explored. The complex that contains this feature also has studios, offices, and a youth-education center. Although not like the “traditional” art of Santa Fe this destination is drawing in the crowds and is showcasing the fact that Santa Fe can be this blend of old and new styles and doesn’t need to be stuck with a singular identity.

Fortini also explores some other traditions that are being played with, updated, or ignored including what is seen as art by Native Americans that doesn’t need to “look like” Native American art and in the category of culinary “art” the popular chiles of Santa Fe.

The article also discusses the issue of an aging population of Santa Fe residents, and what some are doing to try to develop policies and activities to help attract and keep a youth population, like encouraging more night life (as there is a lack) that would be available for and of interest to a younger crowd.

The article also ends with a list of recommendations of both places embracing the traditional and others the new, so check it out: “In Santa Fe, the Past Meets the Future.”

Violet Crown Santa Fe

Violet Crown Santa Fe: Santa Fe spin-off of Austin-based cinema

Violet Crown Santa Fe (Source: Santa Fe Reporter)

I’m pleased to report on our thoroughly enjoyable evening at Violet Crown Santa Fe (Santa Fe Railyard, 1606 Alcaldesa Street, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, 505-216-5678, santafe.violetcrowncinemas.com) last night. Here’s the skinny.

Violet Crown Santa Fe’s 11 auditoriums feature state of the art technology, wall-to-wall screens, and large and luxurious cinema chairs. (Source: Violet Crown Cinema, Santa Fe )

Too skinny! Aside from the excellent location, the food (and refreshments) are what sets this cinema apart. Here are a few of my reactions after an enjoyable first visit.

Food+Film Fusion in Santa Fe Railyard

Violet Crown Santa Fe is located adjacent to Santa Fe Farmers Market in Santa Fe’s Railyard District, ideal walking distance from Adobe Oasis. (If you’d rather drive, you can park for free (4-hour max) in The Railyard parking garage. Just bring your parking ticket to the cinema and request validation.) It was cold, so we drove. But next next we’ll walk to burn off the calories…

No, not a jumbo bucket of popcorn with ersatz butter. Local food. Tasty local food.

I started with the brussel sprouts.

Brussels sprouts are… flash-fried for crispy outer leaves and lightly lacquered in a sweet-tart apple-cider gastrique, but ours needed some par-cooking — their tough, overly firm centers made for onerous chewing. (Source: Laurel Gladden, Santa Fe New Mexican)

Mine were tasty (I added bacon which complemented the garlic, red onion, and apple cider gastric perfectly) but likewise undercooked. Almost impossible to skewer with my fork, especially in the dark. I’ll order them again next time, but I’ll request that they pre-steam or parboil mine.

I also ordered the chicken flautas which were crispy and even tastier than I had anticipated. I kept wondering if cheese had been added despite being absent from the ingredients listed on the menu:

All natural chipotle chicken rolled in New Mexico blue corn tortillas, quick fried until crisp, with guacamole and jicama salad. (Source: Violet Crown Cinema, Santa Fe )

They were delicious, but the texture and richness of the chipotle chicken suggested cheese. I’ve been dairy free for several years, so perhaps it was just my mind playing games. Next time I’ll ask before I order. And if there’s no cheese I’ll order again. And again. They were that good. Perfect movie noshes!

I washed everything down with Santa Sidra dry cider which they offer on draft in addition to dozens of other local brews. This is luxury enough, a vast selection of microbrewer beer to lubricate your next film. Win-win.

Reservations, Seating & Timing

We discovered dining tables that folded out (à la airplane dining) and generously proportioned drink holders.

No more waiting in line unless you relish pre-film banter against a backdrop of popcorn and french fry aroma. Violet Crown Santa Fe seats are all reserved (Bonus: no scrambling in the dark for good seats!) online (in advance) or at the cinema. We purchased our tickets online and it was quick, easy, and user friendly. You even get to pick your own seats. By reserving and paying online we were able to skip the ticket line and head straight to the food ordering counter.

Since it can take a little time to prepare your meal, Violet Crown Santa Fe recommends arriving about 45 minutes before screening in order to ensure that your drinks and meal are ready for you to bring in to the theater. We bumped into friends while waiting and enjoyed a drink together. We refueled just as our meals were delivered and headed in to see The Big Short. We located our comfortable chairs and happily discovered dining tables that folded out (à la airplane dining) and generously proportioned drink holders that easily accommodated our pints.

Innovation & Reinvention

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last decade or so you’ve realized that movie theaters are struggling to adapt to new consumer habits. The convenience and accessibility of on-demand digital entertainment has cut into once standard go-to-the-movies habit of many Americans. Despite the superior viewing experience of a large screen with great sound, I frequently find myself one of only a handful of viewers in an immense theater. Violet Crown Santa Fe responds to this social shift by combining comfort, fresh films, local food, and lots of libations.

Railyard’s new Violet Crown ups the ante for films in SF

Railyard’s new Violet Crown ups the ante for films in SF (Source: Albuquerque Journal)

“We’re trying to marry the two things” – food and film – “in the most pleasant viewing experience we can imagine,” said Bill Banowsky. “We want to give people a reason to get off their couches and come down to our cinema,” he said. “That’s the biggest challenge for theaters anymore… You really have to change the experience so that people really have a reason to go out to a movie.” (Source: Albuquerque Journal)

In short, Violet Crown Santa Fe is reimagining the cinema experience.

Like every other industry reeling from the effects of globalization and a dizzying pace of technological innovation, cinema is in the midst of reinvention. Jacques Paisner, executive director and co-founder of the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival… said Violet Crown’s opening is a harbinger of the city’s willingness to evolve accordingly. (Source: Santa Fe New Mexican)

Smaller, more intimate viewing rooms combined with good food and drink seems like the perfect way to reinvent movie theaters. I’m thrilled with this newest Railyard addition, and my bride and I are already plotting our next visit. See you at Violet Crown Santa Fe!

Your Pied-a-terre in Santa Fe

Pre 2014 Master Bedroom at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe.

Pre 2014 Master Bedroom at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe.

A dream pied-a-terre in Santa Fe at last! Many months of searching for the ideal Santa Fe pied-a-terre finally yielded the spot we’ve fantasized about for so long, and we’ve named it Adobe Oasis. Or maybe it named itself! This handsome home is a high desert sanctuary as soothing as it is welcoming.

That’s last week’s good news. But it’s not the best news. I wanted to save that for today…

Adobe Oasis is Your Pied-a-terre in Santa Fe

Because we live and work far, far away from Santa Fe we are only able to enjoy the Adobe Oasis intermittently. But don’t feel sorry for us. Feel fortunate for yourself, because our absence is your opportunity to savor the Santa Fe lifestyle as a local.

Rear Courtyard at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe (Prior to 2014 Redesign)

Rear Courtyard at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe (Prior to 2014 Redesign)

As soon as we finish redesigning Adobe Oasis we’ll be making it available for short term vacation rentals. If you’re interested, contact Casas de Santa Fe for information and availability.

You’ll love the folks at Casas not only because they offer exceptional service and represent the most extensive and luxurious portfolio of Santa Fe area rental properties. You’ll love them because they are 100% customer-centric. They will custom build the very best Santa Fe experience you can imagine! Whether that includes Adobe Oasis or another pied-a-terre in Santa Fe, we’re confident that the Casas team will meet (and probably exceed) your expectations.

What are you waiting for? Now you’ve got that perfect pied-a-terre in Santa Fe you’ve always dreamed about!

Historic Eastside Location

Adobe Oasis, Entrance (Photo: Peter Ogilvie)

Adobe Oasis, Entrance (Photo: Peter Ogilvie)

Adobe Oasis is located in Santa Fe’s Historic Eastside (new location as of May 2016!) on a serene residential lane within easy walking distance of Canyon Road, the Historic Santa Fe Plaza, and the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. This tranquil sanctuary – concealed behind ivy covered adobe walls ­– offers convenient access to world class galleries, museums, restaurants, spas, farmers’ market, skiing, mountain biking and much more without tourists and downtown bustle. Simply put, Adobe Oasis is paradise found!

Adobe Oasis is Moving

Update: There was sooo much to love about our original Historic Eastside location, but we after a few years we began to yearn for more sunlight, more views, more space, more privacy. As luck would have it, our dream came true when a magnificent property tucked high into the Sangre de Cristos became available. The panoramic vistas and the tranquility enchant us from the moment we first arrived. Though renovations were long overdue, we immediately recognized the potential for this unique Santa Fe property to become the next generation Adobe Oasis. The property was purchased and a top-to-bottom renovation begun in the spring of 2016. We anticipate approximately two years of construction, design, and landscaping will transform our new Adobe Oasis into your dream destination. Stay tuned!

(Note: The original Adobe Oasis, now renamed Adobe Arabella, is still available for short term rentals.)

Perfect Santa Fe Pied-a-terre

Street entrance to Adobe Oasis during the summer of 2013.

Street entrance to Adobe Oasis during the summer of 2013.

After searching for many months we’ve finally found the impossibly perfect Santa Fe pied-a-terre we’ve been dreaming about for years.

Soothing fountain at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe, NM.

Soothing fountain at Adobe Oasis in Santa Fe, NM.

We’ve seen some magnificent properties since last spring (and several eccentric/quirky/weeeird ones too), but nothing ticked every box on our Santa Fe pied-a-terre wishlist. Nothing, that is, until our realtor – as perceptive as she is persistent – emailed photos of this gem. It looked too good to be true, but we teleported to Santa Fe for a closer look just in case this was the impossibly perfect Santa Fe pied-a-terre we’ve been imagining.

And it was.

Eureka! It was love at first sight. And second. And third. We’ve finally found our Santa Fe pied-a-terre.

Our Pied-a-terre is Your Pied-a-terre

That’s the good news. But it’s not the best news… I wanted to save that for last!

Because we live and work far, far away from Santa Fe we are only able to enjoy the Adobe Oasis intermittently. But don’t feel sorry for us. Feel fortunate for yourself, because our absence is your opportunity to enjoy Santa Fe lifestyle as a local. As soon as we finish redesigning the Adobe Oasis we’ll be making it available for short term rentals. If you’re interested, contact Casas de Santa Fe for information and availability. You’ll love the folks at Casas not only because they offer exceptional service and represent the most extensive and luxurious portfolio of Santa Fe area rental properties. You’ll love them because they are 100% customer centric. They will custom build the very best Santa Fe experience you could imagine! Whether that includes Adobe Oasis or another Santa Fe pied-a-terre, we’re confident that the Casas team will meet (if not exceed) your expectations.